rest in peace, pt i – the dark things

// preface –

The past three years of my life was a matter of symptoms, occasionally peaking out to say hello, like little demons.
This year was a matter of diagnoses, like waging war.

Here is “rest in peace”, a 2-part series of selected memories, depicting my struggle against insomnia.


// part i – the dark things

“How long can you hold your breath underwater? How much can your body take before you lose your mind?”

Every morning, I open my day by opening my journal.
Today, I opened my journal and wrote with shaky hands,

“No more dreams.”

– as a prayer to God.

I wake up.

Or at least my eyes do. And my ears.

I hear silky, alto harmonies and reverb-coated church music, gently serenading my awakening. My vision clears and I can see my messy room. Tony must have left while I was napping.

I reach over to pause the music but I can’t. My arm feels like a lead weight. A jarring, high-voltage sound wave of static electrifies my eardrums and my entire skull feels its shock.

…What?

I feel my heart rate accelerate, gradually surpassing the peaceful tempo of Chris Tomlin’s church music.

One.

Okay. Just breathe.

I try again, this time with my other arm, but it, too, is weighed down by a thousand-ton anchor. Head-crushing electricity and earsplitting static runs its current through my cranium.

Two.

Shit.

My heart rate continues to escalate, and so does my panic.

I try thrusting my body upright, but the harder I try, the stronger the electricity, the louder the static.

Three.

I feel a chill wash over my limp body, as if someone else is in the room to confirm and give voice to my fears.

Yes. You’re trapped.

Four.

“Help.”
Only my lips don’t move. I feel something covering my mouth. More static.

Then, He starts laughing at me.

I hear it coming from Tony’s bed.

But, you’re not Tony.
And you’re definitely not Chris Tomlin either.

Five.

“Help me”, I scream silently, as the man in the corner continues to laugh at me.

Just give up. You can’t move anyways, so it’s not worth wasting the energy.

Six.

The window next to my bed begins to shatter. Now there is a woman, too, and she is shrieking.

I need to get out.

I struggle with all the strength I can muster, and then some – desperately trying to force my way through the quicksand, through the static.

Seven.

Finally, I feel my right shoulder twitch, breaking the surface, breaking paralysis.

Eight.

But only for a split second. And then it’s back under again.

The more you struggle, the faster you’ll sink.

I ignore the voice and continue swimming.

The Laughing Man gets louder and louder, and so does the Shrieking Woman.

Nine.

All the while, Chris Tomlin continues to hum softly in the background, serving as a haunting soundtrack for this lucid nightmare.

My shoulder twitches again.

The noise is getting so loud, I think the throbbing just might tear my head open.

Until,

Ten.

Air. I can breathe.

Eleven.
Twelve.
Thirteen

My body rolls over.

I scramble through my blankets for my phone and dial Tony’s number.

On average, it takes anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours for me to fall asleep. Some nights, I don’t sleep.

I have a friend who can almost will himself into falling asleep. As if he just needs to flip a switch in his system and wait for it to close all its programs and shut down.

My nights are not quite the same. My nights are more like a long boat ride along a dark river with lots of fog.

I row and row for a little while, until I reach a certain point, and then I stop. I somehow know that at this point, I have to give up my oars, so I throw them overboard.

Eventually, I approach a bottleneck in the river and there stands a lone figure keeping watch over the choke point. Like a sentinel of sleep.

He, or it, motions for me to disembark my boat and swim the remainder of the journey.

I continue my nightly pilgrimage floating on my back and allowing the current of the lazy river carry me onwards. It is quiet and serene as I gaze at the starry night above me.

For some time, I drift on and on and the stars get brighter and brighter. At certain moments, my mind is so numbed that I cannot tell if I am floating in water or floating in space.

The current picks up and the sound of rushing water crescendos, but I pay no mind. I am hypnotized.

Time slows down as the rapids flow faster.

My body drifts, and my mind follows,

closer and closer,

until,

I fall.

I think the world is ending for some reason.
Why is everyone running?

Oh. Zombies.

All my friends are here.

Oh shit, we gotta go. Zombies are coming.

“Guys, we gotta run.”

Oh good, Evelyn is here. She’s the most optimistic person you could possibly have around in a zombie apocalypse.

We run as fast as we can but that’s a lot slower than I remember. My legs feel weighed down, like lead weights.

I turn around to see if Evelyn is struggling too but she’s not. She’s a zombie now.

“Evelyn, NO!”

She opens her jaw of gnashing teeth and takes a full bite straight into my skull.

I jolt awake.

Static. Cranium-shattering, electrifying static.

One.

No. No, not this again.
A chill runs through my limp body.

Two.

Okay, just calm down. First things first.

Breathe. Make sure you can breathe.

Inhale.

Three.

Exhale. Okay.

My eyes dart around to check the corners of the room. To see if he’s there.

Four.

But I hear no laughing. Tony isn’t here either.

Okay, just try moving your arm. Just a bit.

Static.

Five.

GODDAMMIT!

Okay. Inhale. Try again.
Just one twitch.

Static.

Six.

Just keep swimming… up,
through the static, through the quicksand,
towards the surface.

Just.

One.

Seven.

Twitch!!

Okay.

Exhale.

We’re gonna do this. We’re gonna get out of here.

Eight.

The static is unbearable.

I’m so close to the surface I can see everything but my vision is distorted by the ripples. And everything sounds muffled. My ears are still submerged.

Inhale.

Nine.

Okay, just gotta will my body into motion.
Just gotta… find that “switch”.

I focus harder and the static thickens. It intensifies, as if it knows I’m trying to escape its grasp.

“Just. Move.”

I feel my head starting to split open.

When finally,

Ten.

Air.

My body rolls over, now dampened by sweat.

Exhale.

After a while, I start developing this fear of falling asleep. Night time is not what it used to be.

I try negotiating with the Sentinel, asking if I can keep my boat for the journey, but it is no use. His word is ironclad. And besides, that’s just not how it works. If I want to go on, I have to surrender. It’s the only way.

So each night, I would lay my body down and float on my back in the black river, exposing myself to whatever lurked beneath the surface.

It seemed like the Dark Things would come when I was most vulnerable. In that strange, twilight-zone limbo between waking and sleeping, or vice versa.

Some nights, I would be this close to the Fall, and they would jolt me awake with that awful static, but only for a split second. Like a tease, reminding me of my powerlessness of being a sleeper.

I’ve seen things that people are not supposed to ever see.
Like when the anesthetics fail to kick in, and glitch during surgery.

People aren’t supposed to wake up during surgery.
People aren’t supposed to hear creepy laughing men when they wake up.
People aren’t supposed to wake up before their bodies do.

Even if I make it to the Fall, the Dark Things follow me into my dreams.

I know this feeling well –
trying to reverse time and beat the sunset,
trying to savor our last moments together,
trying to prolong this sleepover,

just one more night, just one more memory.

We are literally counting down her last minutes, sitting around the house in tense anticipation.

Last words, last group photos… last.

Then, at the end of the day, a van would pick her up and take her to the airport.

I derp around the room, unsure of how to spend my last day with her. Unsure of how to say goodbye.

For a moment, the anxiety subsides and it is pure emotion. I think about not being able to see Evelyn and start sobbing so hard that my squinty eyes swell up, and then, I really cannot see her now.

Well, this just will not do, I think to myself and leave the house. I need to at least be able to see her face when we part ways. When we hug.

My vision returns to me but I really, really need to use the bathroom now. I walk around town because apparently, the house doesn’t have toilets.

I pee and pee.
…And pee.

Good Lord.

After taking the longest pee ever recorded, I sense that it is time.

I’ve been gone for far too long.

I book it out of the store and sprint back to the house. I dodge pedestrians and cars with a panic within me that weighs me down so, so heavily. Like lead weights.

Evelyn must be gone by now. I missed it.

I sprint faster anyways, trying to reverse time.

I finally make it back and she is still there. A wave of relief washes over my heavy body. I catch my breath and tell myself to chill.

I’m back. We’re okay.
Just gotta sit tight and wait for her to finish taking group photos.

Alright.
Just like you rehearsed.

Just gotta hand her the letter.

Say the thing, and hug her.

You can do this.

When all of the sudden,

I wake up.

I want to cry, but I cannot.

Oh God. Why did you have to do it?

It was a sweet moment, seeing Evelyn again. It was a bitter moment, parting ways again.

We smiled. Too tired of asking “why does it have to be this way?” Too tired to put up a fight. So just we smiled. It was almost amusing, like the darkest of comedies.

It was a sweet moment, seeing her again. It was a bitter moment, parting ways again. It was forged from real memories and now, backdropped for dreams.

Little did I know that a third flavor would be added. An unwelcome aftertaste.

She kissed me. Subtly at first, not-so-subtly the second time. We were just hugging.

We felt like outlaws, indulging in our rebellious and secretive romance.

I kissed her back. I had to.
We knew what we were doing to each other. We were drinking poison. But it was so intoxicating. Exhilarating.

It was a sweet moment. It was a bitter moment.

“You and I are each other’s greatest mistakes.”

We knew this would not last. Yet we embraced it fully.
How much could we savor our forbidden romance before the inevitable came?

As I turned to leave her embrace, she pulled me back for another kiss, this time on the lips. I felt the rush, my nerves reawakening, only to crash seconds later like a short-circuited caffeine high.

I was taken aback. Not because it was bad, but because it was familiar. The taste of her lips. It was not her’s. Because this tasted like the lips of another lover I had lost long ago. Because that kiss was the only one I’ve ever known.

An unwelcome aftertaste, if you will. Forged from real memories, backdropped for dreams.

I wake up.

I want to cry, but I cannot.

It was a sweet moment. It was a bitter moment.

Today, I opened my journal and wrote with shaky hands,

“No more dreams.”

– as a prayer to the Lord.

I wrote it with a smudge of sadness, as I pride myself as a dreamer, someone with an unstoppable imagination. But sometimes, the things we imagine can find their way into our lives and haunt us, like monsters.

After you have enough dreams like this, you begin to question what’s real and what’s made up by your subconscious.

It’s… not good for me. It’s unhealthy. And I need it to stop.

But what real choice do I have if I am asleep?

 

 

– to be continued.

// part i – the dark things

Disclaimer: Tony and Evelyn are real person(s), given aliases for storytelling and privacy purposes.

mister deludo

There once was a man named Mr. Deludo who kept a monster hidden in his basement.

No one really knows where the Monster came from.

But then again, no one had been able to get a good read on Mr. Deludo as of late. Mr. Deludo was a family man but even his closest friends and neighbors started to suspect that something was dangerously wrong at home.

Some of the townsfolk noticed him making frequent late-night strolls to the local graveyard.

Each time he came home, he would be startled to see his wife sitting in the living room, waiting for him.

“Oh hiya, honey.
Shouldn’t you be sleeping?”

After a while, people suspected that the Monster must have followed him home after one of his cemetery visitations.

For some time, no one knew about the Monster, not even Mr. Deludo himself. But each and every night, he woke up while the world was sleeping to go downstairs and feed the Monster.

By morning, Mr. Deludo would remember none of it and resume his normal life. His eyes drooped from restless nights as he drove his two children to school on the way to work each day.

Weeks passed and the neighbors caught on. They could hear the Monster’s rumbling at night, when the air was still enough. But whenever they tried to bring it up, Mr. Deludo would simply deny it, because even he did not know the truth.

This went on for months and months and the Monster continued to grow and grow.

Eventually, the Monster grew so big that Mr. Deludo could not deny it any longer that something was lurking beneath the floorboards.

One day, his wife caught him in the act of his nightly clandestine activities.

“Oh hiya, honey. Shouldn’t you be sleeping?”

“We need to talk.”

Mrs. Deludo sobbed as she blubbered her way through the messy and tear-soaked intervention.

“How could you do this to us??
Think about the family… Think of our children.”

And Mr. Deludo sobbed with her, as he finally confronted the harrowing truth about himself.

“You have to get rid of the Monster.”
Mrs. Deludo managed to mumble through the tissues.

“And no more walks to the graveyard.”

The next day, Mr. Deludo bought a gun.

At this point, the Monster had already grown so big and so strong that Mr. Deludo wondered if a gun would get the job done. Not to mention that the Monster was cunning, perhaps more deceiving than its master.

None of that really mattered though because each night, Mr. Deludo still found himself helplessly opening the door to the basement and feeding the Monster.

He knew what he was doing and he knew what he was doing was wrong, but he simply could not help it. Because though he hated the awful beast, he had grown a strange affinity for it.

So he fed the Monster, night after night.
Like a slave to his own conscience.

A week had gone by, then two, and the Monster grew bigger still. Excuses were running out and so was his time.

“You need to kill the Monster.”
Mrs. Deludo demanded.

“If you kill me, I’ll kill your wife and kids.”
The Monster counterattacked.

Mr. Deludo’s heart was torn and any more of this agony, he felt his life would split into two.

Finally, Mrs. Deludo could take it no longer. Her patience had burned out and she issued her ultimatum, threatening to leave the house and take the kids with her.

“Kill the Monster!”
She screamed in crazed desperation.

“I.. I- I can’t.”

A look of horror spread across her tear-stained face.

“You what??”

“I just.. can’t.”

More blubbering.

“It’s either us”, she said, grasping their two kids in her trembling arms, “or the Monster.”

That night, Mr. Deludo loaded his gun and went downstairs into the basement.

The Monster died a long and stubborn death. Multiple gunshots pierced the night and echoed throughout all of town, and when the bullets ran out, Mr. Deludo resorted to makeshift means of murder. The townsfolk shuddered at the sounds of Mr. Deludo’s deranged screaming, the Monster’s wailing, and the thought that they couldn’t always differentiate between the two.

Until finally, the house was silent again.
The neighbors went to bed, knowing that the belated deed of riddance was done.

Mr. Deludo carried the Monster’s still-twitching body out of his empty house and walked over to the local graveyard.

He strolled through the rows and rows of gravestones he knew so well, until he reached the cemetery’s edge. His pace slowed as he walked down the final row, grasping the Monster in his trembling arms.

Finally, he stopped and stood in front of three tombstones with the names of his wife and two kids engraved in them.

The Monster breathed its last.

It was the longest walk home that night.

As he trudged back home, Mr. Deludo replayed the murder scene over and over in his mind. But it was not the piercing gunshots, nor the Monster’s howling, nor even his own screams that still rang in his ears, but the ensuing silence.

It was too quiet.

When he got back home, he closed the door behind him and was startled to hear the voice of his wife echoing from the living room.

“Oh hiya, honey.
Shouldn’t you be sleeping?”

 

help[less]

I always knew it would come to this.
From the start, our relationship was on a timer.

Last week, my therapist and I began asking the question –
“Do I need therapy anymore?”

So we dug into the soil of memory. We dug and dug, until we got lost in the labyrinth of tunnels. We found pieces of my childhood, fossilized stories of family.

I saw my dad’s face, though it was blurry like a faded polaroid.
I could never see too clearly in class and I didn’t get glasses until the 8th grade. But it mattered not. I had to pay attention, just in case I missed something. Just in case I messed up.

My dad was a sensei.
And, I, his apprentice. Being lectured and trained to survive the “real world”.

But I never learned much anyways.
I was always too slow.

I saw my mother’s face.
It was hazy from the sheer speed she traveled at, trying to take care of all of our family’s needs. All but her own.

She was everywhere and she was nowhere.

I’d catch a cold and her motherly instincts would kick into overdrive. There would never be a shortage of warm fluids and freshly-cut fruit. Her love language tasted like rice porridge and Korean pears.

My mom was a superhero.

Then I’d recover, but she kept cooking porridge and buying fruit. Taking care of needs that were not there.

She couldn’t switch off.

I never really figured out how to talk to them, or hold a friendship.
But they taught me a lot of things. And took care of me.

She sat across the room from me but we were always in the same group. She essentially saved me from flunking the first test, so naturally, I hung out with her.

Eventually, we developed a rhythm of meeting up after school every Monday by the blue lunch tables.
Then every Wednesday.
Then every Thursday.

Then almost every day.

I told my parents I had to see a tutor. A new after-school program. They bought it.

She was someone special to me.

Some days, we’d actually talk about english homework.

Other days, we’d talk about life, when life was not school and writing essays. We’d talk about things that made us feel alive, when studying made us feel empty, like robots. We’d talk about things we actually nerded out over, when it wasn’t chemistry and calculus.

In a hollow, ruthlessly competitive environment that seemed to value numbers more than people, I felt that someone actually cared about me. Saw me for who I was beyond my grades.

In a place so cold and lifeless, she made me feel understood. Known.

Warm.

“I’m not sure where to begin.”

“Well, why did you pick up the phone and call in the first place?”

“Because.. I needed help. Professional help. I needed someone to save me.”

“From what?”

“From destroying myself.”

“Mm. Tell me more about that.”

“Well.. I went to Thailand last summer on a mission trip. Little did I know I would meet my long-lost childhood tormentor. When I came back, the demons followed me home.”

“Which ones?”

“The ones that ridicule me. The ones that tell me I’m not enough. And call me B̂ā.”

B̂ā?”

“Means ‘stupid’ in Thai. Or ‘mentally retarded’, to be more specific.”

“He did all that to you?”

I nodded grimly at her.

“I’m so sorry.”

“Every day, he would teach us his way doing things around the house. Like how to wash the dishes. Or laundry. Things like that. And whenever I messed up, he would beat me with his words.”

“My goodness.. That must have been so painful.”

“The problem was, in his eyes, I was always doing it wrong. No matter how hard I tried, I could never get it right.”

She paused. Sorted through the soil.

“He was the sensei.”

I nodded.

“And I was his failed apprentice.”

The bell rang and the daily exodus of pubescent teenagers formed towards the door.

I headed towards her desk.

“Hey.”

“Hey! What did you think?”

“It was hard”, I lied. “Should have just slept.”

“Wanna meet after school? Maybe I can work my magic.”

“Yeah, sure.”

“Lunch tables?”

“Sounds good.”

She smiled.

I think I liked her but I didn’t know what that meant yet.

I would probably not retain anything she taught me but she meant something special to me.

So I went to the blue lunch tables every week. Perfect attendance.

One day, my parents caught on that my afternoon “tutoring activities” weren’t actually raising my grades.

Maybe this one will work instead, they thought, and promptly signed me up for yet another after-school program.

I could not fight back. Because that would unveil the beautiful lie I had spent the past couple months fabricating. Because that would make me a worse son than I already was.

So I found other ways of lashing out. Like yelling at them. Closing the door to the office den I worked in. Closing other, more important doors.

Shutting them out of my life.

We saw each other less and less.

We were not in the same friend group to begin with, and high school has a petty way of handling friendship. Now, the only space we shared – blue lunch tables after school – was taken from us.

Our meetings became shorter and shorter. Less and less often.
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, some weeks, if we were lucky,
then Wednesdays and Fridays,
then only Wednesdays.

Then nothing.

She became a senior and I jumped off the edge to college.

I spent many of my afternoons staring off into the crayon-vandalized walls of my new after-school institution.

I don’t think I ever properly mourned
her disappearance
my disappearance
from each other’s lives.

I did not know how. So into space I stared. Like a trauma victim in comatose. So much for raising grades.

I wondered what became of our friendship.
How did we get here? If I didn’t have her, did I have friends at all? Or were they all just robots?

I wondered if she found out about my affections for her.

Or if she found out that I actually had a thing for English and literature. That I tried my hand at creative writing and was actually pretty good at it.

That I didn’t need her help anymore.

I wondered if she found out what I had turned her into.

One time, I got sick. And her motherly instincts kicked into overdrive.

Freshly-cooked, warm rice porridge. Honey lemon tea. Korean pears.

Then, I got better.
But I stayed in bed. Told her that my throat still burned.

Just a little while longer.

At the moment, I didn’t really know why I did that.

But I think about how she made me feel in those moments – cared for and seen.

That in the coldest of colds, she made me feel warm.

I think about who she was, what she meant to me. She was a caretaker. A superhero.

My mom was also a superhero.
And I liked being rescued.

“Justin, you’re not just living.
You’re thriving.”

I looked at her, my mouth agape. Not because it wasn’t true but because it had been so long. Did I even believe her?

I sat on the couch, my butt on the very edge, staring into my favorite blank space on the wall of the warmly-lit room.

It was April and I sat on the very edge of a cliff, on the verge of transition. The verge of graduation, and “real life”, whatever that is. Adult things, like finding a job, paying my own bills, and waking up early.

Becoming self-sufficient. Buying my own rice porridge and Korean pears. Terrifying things of that nature.

I sat on the edge of a new chapter of relationship. I looked at the cliff and wondered which friendships would survive the fall when I jumped.

I always knew it would come to this.
From the start, our relationship was on a timer.

She spoke, snapping me out of my state of wall-staring rumination.

“So. What do you think? What would it look like for us to finish well?”

We spoke of seeing each other less. Twice, maybe even once a month.

Always Wednesdays. Always one hour, exactly.

But less and less.

Until nothing.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

I pulled out my weapon of choice and started writing –
“This is not a goodbye letter.

It is a bizarre thing, talking with your friends about how to be friends to each other. But sometimes, it is what we must do.

You walked in at a curious time of my life.
I was not entirely myself, and yet, I was more myself than I had ever been. And perhaps, it was the same for you. Funny how suffering does that to people.

I often wonder who you are to me.
Sometimes, I say friend. Other times, I do not know.

I think about the ways you’ve helped me through some of the most difficult and important times of my life. I remember the ways you comforted me and saved me from destroying myself.

In the darkest and loneliest moments, you made me feel like someone actually cared about me.
In the coldest and most lifeless times, you made me feel understood. Known. Warm.

Now that things are not so dark, now that life is not so cold, I think about that more than ever – who you are to me.

And the thought terrifies me. I fear I might lose you somehow. That as I sit on the edge of transition, maybe our relationship will not survive the fall.

Because,

Who are you if I don’t need you?
What is our relationship if I don’t need saving anymore?

I turned you into something you’re not. I made myself into someone I’m not.

I turned you into a superhero.
And I wanted to be rescued.

But I was never meant to need you.

I don’t want to be your friend because you can meet my needs, or because you can make me feel a certain way. Even if you are uncannily good at it.

I want to be your friend because you are uniquely and flavorfully you.

So I guess this is me saying,
I don’t need you anymore.

And that is a beautiful thing.

tater todd tales

I have a pet rainbow unicorn who can glow in the dark.

His name is Tater Todd but I call him Todd.

Tater Todd is my good friend and this story is for him. Here are some tatertot-sized tales about the best unicorn friend in the world.

I sleep with Todd every single night.

People say they stop sleeping with their animal friends when they grow up. I’m still not sure what growing up means but that does not sound fun.

So I still sleep with him every night.

I adopted Todd about four years ago so we’ve been through a lot together.

I go on a lot of adventures and secret missions and I usually bring Todd along so he can see all the wonderful things I see.

Whenever he sees something really beautiful, his rainbow fur turns a little brighter than before. I think he is happy in those times.

It makes me happy.

I sometimes wonder where Todd came from.

I tell him I came from Mom and Dad but he won’t tell me where he’s from.

Todd does not say much. Maybe I won’t like what he’ll tell me.

I don’t know.

Todd has magical powers.

He definitely has way more than I do but I have only seen some of them in action.

Sometimes, there are evil things that come into my bedroom at night. I don’t ever see them but they make the night even darker.

On the darkest nights, Todd will shine his rainbow and things will be okay.

Todd is a protector.

A friend told me once that I’ll hold Todd at night until I can hold a woman.

We’re not really friends anymore.

I am not sure if Todd can fly.

I thought most unicorns could but I guess everybody is unique.

“Why didn’t you fly away in the accident?”, I used to ask him.

Todd was seriously injured once.
I kept him at a friend’s house for a little while and his derpy pug dog chewed out Todd’s eyeballs and ate them. Life was not the same after that.

Sometimes, I pray to Jesus to heal his blindness. I hear He does that sort of thing.

Todd is still blind but he sees things that I cannot see. We cover each other’s blindspots.

I noticed that Todd’s rainbow did not shine so bright after the attack.

I noticed that the same thing happens whenever my mom tells me to give him away. Each time, he loses a little bit of his color.

After a while, I stopped taking Todd out so much.

It is a scary world out there. I wondered if the world was stealing Todd’s colors from him. I wondered if Todd was losing his magic.

Maybe it is my turn to be the protector.

No one else has animal friends anymore.

Everybody else has given them away and they seem to be okay with it.

Why is that? Will I ever give Todd away?

Last summer, I was separated from Todd for a long time.

It was the hardest summer yet. When I got to Thailand, they made us lighten our load because we brought too much stuff so Todd had to spend seven weeks inside of a luggage bag.

Sometimes, I wonder if he’s forgiven me for that.

But maybe it is a good thing he did not see what I saw. No child should have seen what I saw.

But then again, he says the same thing about the luggage bag.

Todd ran out of battery juice a long time ago.

But somehow, he can still keep me warm, even when my best friends can’t.
Even when God can’t.

One time, my teacher told us that we spend one-third of our lives asleep.

Todd and I spend a lot of time together.

I am not sure what Todd’s horn does.

Todd is kind of a mystery to me. Maybe that’s why we are such great friends.

I like the mysterious ones.

One night, it got especially dark.

I think something was inside my room.

It got so dark that the dark was darker than when I closed my eyes. So I kept them closed.

Todd doesn’t have eyes but I think he could see the evil man. We couldn’t do anything because our powers weren’t strong enough. So we just held each other under my blanket.

I’ve never held Todd so tightly.

Todd does not know what I went through in Thailand.
He was in a suitcase. I think about that a lot.

I guess I don’t know what he went through either. I can’t imagine what that must have been like.

We could not be there for each other in a really hard time but we are still buddies. He still protects me at night and I still take care of him. We might not understand some bits of our stories but we still love each other.

And so it is with my human friends.

I take Todd outside more now.

I am not so scared of what the outside world can do to him anymore because we’ve been through so much together.

If we can go through the dark nights and beat up the bad guys that come into the room, we can do anything.

I don’t think I will ever give Todd away.

He is one of the best friends ever because he believes in me. Even the weirdest things about me, like my imagination. That means a lot.

He tells me that the harder I believe in him, the stronger he gets. I didn’t believe him at first but then I tried it and it worked.

Now his rainbow fur shines brighter than ever.

Todd is magic.

And he is my friend.

Tater Todd Tales is a response to prompt #2 of the Raconteurs, a collective of storytellers. Read more of our stories here.