rest in peace, pt i – the dark things

// preface –

The past three years of my life was a matter of symptoms, occasionally peaking out to say hello, like little demons.
This year was a matter of diagnoses, like waging war.

Here is “rest in peace”, a 2-part series of selected memories, depicting my struggle against insomnia.


// part i – the dark things

“How long can you hold your breath underwater? How much can your body take before you lose your mind?”

Every morning, I open my day by opening my journal.
Today, I opened my journal and wrote with shaky hands,

“No more dreams.”

– as a prayer to God.

I wake up.

Or at least my eyes do. And my ears.

I hear silky, alto harmonies and reverb-coated church music, gently serenading my awakening. My vision clears and I can see my messy room. Tony must have left while I was napping.

I reach over to pause the music but I can’t. My arm feels like a lead weight. A jarring, high-voltage sound wave of static electrifies my eardrums and my entire skull feels its shock.

…What?

I feel my heart rate accelerate, gradually surpassing the peaceful tempo of Chris Tomlin’s church music.

One.

Okay. Just breathe.

I try again, this time with my other arm, but it, too, is weighed down by a thousand-ton anchor. Head-crushing electricity and earsplitting static runs its current through my cranium.

Two.

Shit.

My heart rate continues to escalate, and so does my panic.

I try thrusting my body upright, but the harder I try, the stronger the electricity, the louder the static.

Three.

I feel a chill wash over my limp body, as if someone else is in the room to confirm and give voice to my fears.

Yes. You’re trapped.

Four.

“Help.”
Only my lips don’t move. I feel something covering my mouth. More static.

Then, He starts laughing at me.

I hear it coming from Tony’s bed.

But, you’re not Tony.
And you’re definitely not Chris Tomlin either.

Five.

“Help me”, I scream silently, as the man in the corner continues to laugh at me.

Just give up. You can’t move anyways, so it’s not worth wasting the energy.

Six.

The window next to my bed begins to shatter. Now there is a woman, too, and she is shrieking.

I need to get out.

I struggle with all the strength I can muster, and then some – desperately trying to force my way through the quicksand, through the static.

Seven.

Finally, I feel my right shoulder twitch, breaking the surface, breaking paralysis.

Eight.

But only for a split second. And then it’s back under again.

The more you struggle, the faster you’ll sink.

I ignore the voice and continue swimming.

The Laughing Man gets louder and louder, and so does the Shrieking Woman.

Nine.

All the while, Chris Tomlin continues to hum softly in the background, serving as a haunting soundtrack for this lucid nightmare.

My shoulder twitches again.

The noise is getting so loud, I think the throbbing just might tear my head open.

Until,

Ten.

Air. I can breathe.

Eleven.
Twelve.
Thirteen

My body rolls over.

I scramble through my blankets for my phone and dial Tony’s number.

On average, it takes anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours for me to fall asleep. Some nights, I don’t sleep.

I have a friend who can almost will himself into falling asleep. As if he just needs to flip a switch in his system and wait for it to close all its programs and shut down.

My nights are not quite the same. My nights are more like a long boat ride along a dark river with lots of fog.

I row and row for a little while, until I reach a certain point, and then I stop. I somehow know that at this point, I have to give up my oars, so I throw them overboard.

Eventually, I approach a bottleneck in the river and there stands a lone figure keeping watch over the choke point. Like a sentinel of sleep.

He, or it, motions for me to disembark my boat and swim the remainder of the journey.

I continue my nightly pilgrimage floating on my back and allowing the current of the lazy river carry me onwards. It is quiet and serene as I gaze at the starry night above me.

For some time, I drift on and on and the stars get brighter and brighter. At certain moments, my mind is so numbed that I cannot tell if I am floating in water or floating in space.

The current picks up and the sound of rushing water crescendos, but I pay no mind. I am hypnotized.

Time slows down as the rapids flow faster.

My body drifts, and my mind follows,

closer and closer,

until,

I fall.

I think the world is ending for some reason.
Why is everyone running?

Oh. Zombies.

All my friends are here.

Oh shit, we gotta go. Zombies are coming.

“Guys, we gotta run.”

Oh good, Evelyn is here. She’s the most optimistic person you could possibly have around in a zombie apocalypse.

We run as fast as we can but that’s a lot slower than I remember. My legs feel weighed down, like lead weights.

I turn around to see if Evelyn is struggling too but she’s not. She’s a zombie now.

“Evelyn, NO!”

She opens her jaw of gnashing teeth and takes a full bite straight into my skull.

I jolt awake.

Static. Cranium-shattering, electrifying static.

One.

No. No, not this again.
A chill runs through my limp body.

Two.

Okay, just calm down. First things first.

Breathe. Make sure you can breathe.

Inhale.

Three.

Exhale. Okay.

My eyes dart around to check the corners of the room. To see if he’s there.

Four.

But I hear no laughing. Tony isn’t here either.

Okay, just try moving your arm. Just a bit.

Static.

Five.

GODDAMMIT!

Okay. Inhale. Try again.
Just one twitch.

Static.

Six.

Just keep swimming… up,
through the static, through the quicksand,
towards the surface.

Just.

One.

Seven.

Twitch!!

Okay.

Exhale.

We’re gonna do this. We’re gonna get out of here.

Eight.

The static is unbearable.

I’m so close to the surface I can see everything but my vision is distorted by the ripples. And everything sounds muffled. My ears are still submerged.

Inhale.

Nine.

Okay, just gotta will my body into motion.
Just gotta… find that “switch”.

I focus harder and the static thickens. It intensifies, as if it knows I’m trying to escape its grasp.

“Just. Move.”

I feel my head starting to split open.

When finally,

Ten.

Air.

My body rolls over, now dampened by sweat.

Exhale.

After a while, I start developing this fear of falling asleep. Night time is not what it used to be.

I try negotiating with the Sentinel, asking if I can keep my boat for the journey, but it is no use. His word is ironclad. And besides, that’s just not how it works. If I want to go on, I have to surrender. It’s the only way.

So each night, I would lay my body down and float on my back in the black river, exposing myself to whatever lurked beneath the surface.

It seemed like the Dark Things would come when I was most vulnerable. In that strange, twilight-zone limbo between waking and sleeping, or vice versa.

Some nights, I would be this close to the Fall, and they would jolt me awake with that awful static, but only for a split second. Like a tease, reminding me of my powerlessness of being a sleeper.

I’ve seen things that people are not supposed to ever see.
Like when the anesthetics fail to kick in, and glitch during surgery.

People aren’t supposed to wake up during surgery.
People aren’t supposed to hear creepy laughing men when they wake up.
People aren’t supposed to wake up before their bodies do.

Even if I make it to the Fall, the Dark Things follow me into my dreams.

I know this feeling well –
trying to reverse time and beat the sunset,
trying to savor our last moments together,
trying to prolong this sleepover,

just one more night, just one more memory.

We are literally counting down her last minutes, sitting around the house in tense anticipation.

Last words, last group photos… last.

Then, at the end of the day, a van would pick her up and take her to the airport.

I derp around the room, unsure of how to spend my last day with her. Unsure of how to say goodbye.

For a moment, the anxiety subsides and it is pure emotion. I think about not being able to see Evelyn and start sobbing so hard that my squinty eyes swell up, and then, I really cannot see her now.

Well, this just will not do, I think to myself and leave the house. I need to at least be able to see her face when we part ways. When we hug.

My vision returns to me but I really, really need to use the bathroom now. I walk around town because apparently, the house doesn’t have toilets.

I pee and pee.
…And pee.

Good Lord.

After taking the longest pee ever recorded, I sense that it is time.

I’ve been gone for far too long.

I book it out of the store and sprint back to the house. I dodge pedestrians and cars with a panic within me that weighs me down so, so heavily. Like lead weights.

Evelyn must be gone by now. I missed it.

I sprint faster anyways, trying to reverse time.

I finally make it back and she is still there. A wave of relief washes over my heavy body. I catch my breath and tell myself to chill.

I’m back. We’re okay.
Just gotta sit tight and wait for her to finish taking group photos.

Alright.
Just like you rehearsed.

Just gotta hand her the letter.

Say the thing, and hug her.

You can do this.

When all of the sudden,

I wake up.

I want to cry, but I cannot.

Oh God. Why did you have to do it?

It was a sweet moment, seeing Evelyn again. It was a bitter moment, parting ways again.

We smiled. Too tired of asking “why does it have to be this way?” Too tired to put up a fight. So just we smiled. It was almost amusing, like the darkest of comedies.

It was a sweet moment, seeing her again. It was a bitter moment, parting ways again. It was forged from real memories and now, backdropped for dreams.

Little did I know that a third flavor would be added. An unwelcome aftertaste.

She kissed me. Subtly at first, not-so-subtly the second time. We were just hugging.

We felt like outlaws, indulging in our rebellious and secretive romance.

I kissed her back. I had to.
We knew what we were doing to each other. We were drinking poison. But it was so intoxicating. Exhilarating.

It was a sweet moment. It was a bitter moment.

“You and I are each other’s greatest mistakes.”

We knew this would not last. Yet we embraced it fully.
How much could we savor our forbidden romance before the inevitable came?

As I turned to leave her embrace, she pulled me back for another kiss, this time on the lips. I felt the rush, my nerves reawakening, only to crash seconds later like a short-circuited caffeine high.

I was taken aback. Not because it was bad, but because it was familiar. The taste of her lips. It was not her’s. Because this tasted like the lips of another lover I had lost long ago. Because that kiss was the only one I’ve ever known.

An unwelcome aftertaste, if you will. Forged from real memories, backdropped for dreams.

I wake up.

I want to cry, but I cannot.

It was a sweet moment. It was a bitter moment.

Today, I opened my journal and wrote with shaky hands,

“No more dreams.”

– as a prayer to the Lord.

I wrote it with a smudge of sadness, as I pride myself as a dreamer, someone with an unstoppable imagination. But sometimes, the things we imagine can find their way into our lives and haunt us, like monsters.

After you have enough dreams like this, you begin to question what’s real and what’s made up by your subconscious.

It’s… not good for me. It’s unhealthy. And I need it to stop.

But what real choice do I have if I am asleep?

 

 

– to be continued.

// part i – the dark things

Disclaimer: Tony and Evelyn are real person(s), given aliases for storytelling and privacy purposes.

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